Not much to report

28 January, 2011

It’s over a month since I posted and since then I’ve not played any DBA or done any painting. I’ve been out enjoying the summer, which is all good, and the sum total of my DBA has been my involvement in the Punic Peril campaign, where I’ve had a bit of luck (or quite a lot) with sieges. In Etruria I’ve held out for four seasons now, while in Akra Leuke, after a drubbing in spring, we risked another encounter and got lucky with the siege. I’m not sure how long my luck can last, but it’s fun while it does.

Otherwise, I’ve ordered some figures to round out my Hellenistic armies, for when I get to paint next. I also got a short board game, Empire,  by Philip Sabin from the Society of Ancients. It plays very quickly, but I’m thinking it might make for an interesting vehicle for a DBA campaign. I’ll need to give some thought to the interface between the two games.

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2 Responses to “Not much to report”

  1. Prufrock Says:

    Glad to hear you picked up Empire. It’s got a lot of potential as a campaign engine for tactical games. As you say, the interface is the thing. The odds of winning a campaign go from one-in-six through to five-in-six, so it’s a matter of factoring that into the tactical scenarios.

    It works very well with Lost Battles of course, but I’ll be interested to hear your views on how you might factor the odds in for DBA. It could be something as simple as allowing the stronger army to get x number of re-rolls in the game. An army at +2 might get two re-rolls; an army at +1 might get 1, or something like that.

    Will look forward to hearing your thoughts.

    Cheers,
    Aaron

    • Mark Davies Says:

      With 80 odd battles in Empire, it might take a while to fight them all using DBA. I’m wondering what would be the ones worth doing. Possibly just the ones between players; otherwise I doubt I’d have all the armies required, especially for the more obscure places. However, some of them could be very fun: Carthage attempting to dominate Sicily or Magna Graecia, for instance.


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